Five Ways to Walk in Christianity

When we hear the word “walk”, what probably comes to mind is the physical activity involving our legs that we do everyday to get from point A to point B. Sometimes, when we want to get some fresh air, we take a leisure walk around the park. There are several instances of the word “walk” in the Bible, many of which exhibit a figurative sense of conducting or regulating one’s life. That is, the verb is used in the context of living a certain lifestyle. Paul employed the word “walk” throughout his letters as he instructed the early Christians in how they should conduct their lives. It is clear from his writings that Christianity is more that just a leisure walk in the park. Here I give five ways in which a Christian should walk.

Walk in Unity (Ephesians 4:1-6)

As Christians, we belong to one body, which is the church (Col. 1:18). Therefore, it is imperative that we all walk in unity. We do this by living a life that is worthy of our calling, that is, with humility, gentleness, patience, and love toward our brothers and sisters in Christ. Just as there is one Spirit, one Lord, one hope, one faith, one baptism, and one God and Father of all, we should be eager to conduct ourselves as one body united in peace.

Walk in Love (Ephesians 5:1-7)

Christ loves us and gave himself for us as a sacrifice to God. We should be imitators of God and Christ by walking in love and giving ourselves as a sacrifice to God. Walking in love involves leading a disciplined life and abstaining from sins that hurt one another (vv. 3-4; cf. 2 Thess. 4:9). Sin takes the focus off God and puts it on us, which in turn prohibits us from offering up ourselves in thanksgiving to him for our salvation. The practice of sin also prohibits us from inheriting the kingdom of God.

Walk in Light (Ephesians 5:8-14)

Those who have obeyed the gospel have come out of darkness and have become children of light. Now we have to walk continuously in the light of the Lord, bearing fruit that is good, right, and true. Our light should not be hidden, but rather, it should shine in order to expose the unfruitful works of darkness and make visible our good works so that the world may glorify God (cf. Matt. 5:14-16). When we sin, we must continue to walk in the light by confessing and repenting of our sins so that the blood of Christ cleanses us (1 Jn. 1:5-10).

Walk in Wisdom (Ephesians 5:15-21)

God expects us to walk in wisdom and have an understanding of his will in order to please him (Col 1:9-10). Speaking through the prophet Hosea, he told the Israelites that they were destroyed because of their lack of knowledge. Not knowing the will of God has grave consequences. We learn in Paul’s letters that having an understanding of God’s mystery brings riches and treasures. (Col. 2:1-2). We must not let human wisdom, philosophies, and false doctrines deceive us and lead us astray, but rather, we must walk in truth and obey God’s commandments, having faith in his wisdom and not in ours (1 Cor. 2:5; 2 Jn. 1:4-6; 3 Jn. 1:3).

Walk in Newness of Life (Romans 6:3-11)

Christians are required to change their lifestyle. They are expected to walk in newness of life by putting off the old self and putting on the new self (Eph. 4:22-24; Col. 3:9-10). This change is a continuous process that is initiated in baptism. Baptism is the way in which you die to sin and come alive again (Rom. 6:3-6):

Do you not know that all of us who have been baptized into Christ Jesus were baptized into his death? We were buried therefore with him by baptism into death, in order that, just as Christ was raised from the dead by the glory of the Father, we too might walk in newness of life. For if we have been united with him in a death like his, we shall certainly be united with him in a resurrection like his. We know that our old self was crucified with him in order that the body of sin might be brought to nothing, so that we would no longer be enslaved to sin.

You must be united with Christ in his death, burial, and resurrection through baptism in order to come alive to God and be added to the church that belongs to Christ (Rom. 6:9-11; cf. Matt. 16:18; Acts 2:47):

We know that Christ, being raised from the dead, will never die again; death no longer has dominion over him. 10 For the death he died he died to sin, once for all, but the life he lives he lives to God. 11 So you also must consider yourselves dead to sin and alive to God in Christ Jesus.

Only after this change can one truly walk in unity, love, and wisdom and be a light to the world so that others may come to God for their salvation.

The Afflicted Delivered Through Affliction

Many people question the love and even the existence of God because they see so much pain, suffering, and injustice in the world. They themselves may be experiencing hardship, and they wonder why God would allow them to suffer so much. They think that if truly there were a God, he would not stricken people with sicknesses or cause people to die in terrible ways. However, I believe that, in spite of all the grief that we bear in this life, God does exist. He loves us dearly and only wants the best for us.

Lamentations 3:31 (ESV) says, “31 For the Lord will not cast off forever, 32 but, though he cause grief, he will have compassion according to the abundance of his steadfast love; 33 for he does not afflict from his heart or grieve the children of men.” This passage shows us that our burdens will not last forever. Although God allows us to go through hard times, it’s not because he takes joy in it. He is a compassionate and loving God. But if this is true, we must understand why we find ourselves in affliction. The Bible gives several reasons, but the one that stands out most to me is the need for us to turn to God for help.

David says in Psalm 119: 67 and 71, “Before I was afflicted I went astray, but now I keep your word… It is good for me that I was afflicted, that I might learn your statutes.” Although he was a man after God’s own heart (Acts 13:22; cf. 1 Sam. 13:14), David had a time of weakness where he committed a terrible sin. He had to suffer the consequences of his actions. However, in his affliction, he learned to lean on God and keep his word and statutes in his heart. David’s experience teaches us that when we go astray, God calls our attention back to him by rebuking us or exposing our faults.

There are times, though, when we feel like we have not done anything to deserve chastening. For example, Job was a blameless and upright man who feared God and resisted evil (Job 1:1). God found favor in Job, but the devil believed that if he did not have the protection of God, Job would curse him (Job 1:6-12). God allowed Satan to test Job, and thus, he suffered terribly at the hands of Satan. As Job bore this affliction, he questioned why God would bring this hardship on him. He had no knowledge of the conversation between God and Satan. His friends were convinced that he had done something wrong; however, Job rejected the accusation because he was “righteous in his own eyes” (Job 32:1). We are not perfect; we all sin (Rom. 3:23), but Job refused to accept this and justified himself instead of God (Job 32:1). There was a young man, however, named Elihu who rebuked him and asserted God’s justice. He said to Job in speaking of God (Job 33:15-18):

15 In a dream, in a vision of the night, when deep sleep falls on men, while they slumber on their beds, 16 then he opens the ears of men and terrifies them with warnings, 17 that he may turn man aside from his deed and conceal pride from a man; 18 he keeps back his soul from the pit, his life from perishing by the sword.

God allows us to suffer affliction in order to keep us humble and to make us recognize our weakness and vulnerability.

19 “Man is also rebuked with pain on his bed and with continual strife in his bones, 20 so that his life loathes bread, and his appetite the choicest food. 21 His flesh is so wasted away that it cannot be seen, and his bones that were not seen stick out. 22 His soul draws near the pit, and his life to those who bring death. 23 If there be for him an angel, a mediator, one of the thousand, to declare to man what is right for him, 24 and he is merciful to him, and says, ‘Deliver him from going down into the pit; I have found a ransom; 25 let his flesh become fresh with youth; let him return to the days of his youthful vigor’;

He wants us to turn to him for strength. He wants us to realize that we need to put our trust in him and not in ourselves. When we turn to God and seek his grace and mercy, he accepts us and gives us the comfort that we need. We then praise him even more because he has rescued us from our affliction (Job 32:26-28, 36:15).

26 then man prays to God, and he accepts him; he sees his face with a shout of joy, and he restores to man his righteousness. 27 He sings before men and says: ‘I sinned and perverted what was right, and it was not repaid to me. 28 He has redeemed my soul from going down into the pit, and my life shall look upon the light.’

15 He delivers the afflicted by their affliction and opens their ear by adversity.

God’s thoughts and ways are much higher than ours (Isaiah 55:8). He knows exactly how to deal with his creation. He knows that we seek to do our own will, and in doing so, we neglect him. Therefore, he calls us back by letting us go through certain trials and tribulations. Our response to this should be to turn back and seek him, knowing that he is our strength, stronghold, and refuge in the day of trouble (Jer. 16:9; cf. Ps. 22:19; 59:9).

22 The steadfast love of the Lord never ceases;
his mercies never come to an end;
23 they are new every morning;
great is your faithfulness.
24 “The Lord is my portion,” says my soul,
“therefore I will hope in him.”

-Lamentations 3:22-24

Love Those Who Hate You

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God is merciful, gracious, and patient. Even though we don’t deserve it, he blesses us anyway. He makes the rain fall and the sun shine on the just and the unjust, and he expects us to be like him in this respect. Therefore, we can’t love just the people that love us; we also have to love those that hate and persecute us, which is the real challenge. Christ came to this earth to die so that we all could have the opportunity of salvation and be reconciled with God, and he did it even though we were his enemies. Since he did that great work for us, we should learn how to forgive our enemies and love them even when they hate us. I pray that God would help us through his word to learn how to be merciful, gracious, and patient with others.

Saved by Grace, but what about Works?

Ephesians 2:8-9
For by grace you have been saved through faith. And this is not your own doing; it is the gift of God, not a result of works, so that no one may boast.

James 2:24
24 You see that a person is justified by works and not by faith alone.

There is a lot of discussion on whether our salvation is based on grace through faith or on our works. The most prominent theme in the Bible is the grace and mercy of God. Grace is that God has given us what we do not deserve, and mercy is that He has withheld what we do deserve. He sacrificed His Son for our sins and withheld His wrath. His grace and mercy always have been taken for granted, which is evidenced in the Old and New Testaments and also in modern times. We should be thankful for the gift of grace, which was the atonement for our sins through the sacrifice of His Son. According to Ephesians 2:8-9, our salvation is based on this gift of grace, in which we believed (John 1:12-13; Acts 13:38-39; Romans 3:23, 4:4, 4:16, 11:6; Galatians 2:16). We believe that Jesus Christ is the Son of God, and that He came to die on the cross as a propitiation for our sins (1 John 2:2, 4:10). There was nothing that we could do on our own to cleanse ourselves of the sins we had committed before being saved. And even after receiving His grace, we still continue to sin against each other and against God. However, His grace is so sufficient that the blood of Christ cleanses us of our sins throughout our lives if we continue to walk in the light (cf., 1 John 1:7-10). It is clear that no one can boast of anything they do because we are all guilty of sin, and no matter how much we strive to be righteous, we will never be able to meet the standard (see Romans 7) because our righteousness is like filthy rags.

“as it is written: ‘None is righteous, no, not one; no one understands; no one seeks for God’” (Romans 3:10-11)

“Then what becomes of our boasting? It is excluded. By what kind of law? By a law of works? No, but by the law of faith. For we hold that one is justified by faith apart from works of the law” (Romans 3:27-28).

“You who boast in the law dishonor God by breaking the law” (Romans 2:23).

“But we are all like an unclean thing, and all our righteousnesses are like filthy rags; we all fade as a leaf, and our iniquities, like the wind, have taken us away” (Isaiah 64:6 New King James Version).

So those who believe that we are saved by grace through faith and not by works are correct. It is clearly stated in the Bible. However, in James 2:24 it is also clear that we are justified by works and not by faith alone. Also, there are several verses in the Scriptures that express the fact that we are to do good works as Christians.

“…so as to walk in a manner worthy of the Lord, fully pleasing to him, bearing fruit in every good work and increasing in the knowledge of God” (Colossians 1:10).

“…waiting for our blessed hope, the appearing of the glory of our great God and Savior Jesus Christ, who gave himself for us to redeem us from all lawlessness and to purify for himself a people for his own possession who are zealous for good works” (Titus 2:13-14).

“But be doers of the word, and not hearers only, deceiving yourselves” (James 1:22).

We know that God does not contradict himself, and I believe the reason why these verses appear to be contradictory is because we tend to look at passages without considering the historical context. Let’s start first with the texts that say that salvation is by grace through faith, and not by works. We see this idea emerging mainly in Paul’s letters to the Romans, Galatians, and Ephesians, and also when Paul addresses the Jews and Gentiles in Acts 13. The Jewish Christians were binding themselves to mosaic law (but not out of obligation), and were also trying to bind Gentile Christians to that law. They couldn’t accept the fact that Gentiles could be saved only by the gospel and not by adhering to the law also. They were requiring that the Gentile Christians be circumcised because that was part of their tradition. Paul had to explain to both Jews and Gentiles why their works of the law were no longer necessary (Ephesians 2:8-9): “For by grace you have been saved through faith. And this is not your own doing; it is the gift of God, not a result of works…” The word “works” is referring to the different sacrifices and rituals of the law, such as sin-offerings and circumcision. Jesus was the ultimate sacrifice that would take care of what the law couldn’t do, cleanse them of their sins.

The context of James’ letter to the Jewish Christians was different from that of Paul’s letters. James was addressing Christians that supposedly had faith but weren’t doing the good works that showed their faith. They were hearers of the word but not doers. We could think of them as lukewarm Christians like those in the church in Laodicea (cf., Revelations 3:14-21). James was basically saying to them that just because you believe, it doesn’t mean that you stop there because even the demons believe in God and shudder (cf., James 2:19). According to chapters 1 and 2, these Christians had several issues: favoritism, false wisdom/teaching, lack of humility, lack of mercy and patience with one another, etc. All these things showed that they lacked faith. Their faith was dead because they did not have good works (cf., James 2:20).

So what can we take from these verses that appear to contradict each other? We are indeed saved by grace through our belief that Christ did die for the sins of mankind, and because of that, we should have an active faith, doing what we have been created to – good works (Ephesians 2:10). We cannot say that we love God and have faith in Him if we do not keep His commandments. Many of us think that love and faith in God is a feeling, and I believe many live a life of distress when they don’t “feel” these things. The fact of the matter is love and faith is doing. Galatians 5:6 says, “For in Christ Jesus neither circumcision nor uncircumcision counts for anything, but only faith working through love.” (emphasis is mine). That is, faith is express through love, and love is action:

“If you love me, you will keep my commandments” (John 14:15).

“You are my friends if you do what I command you” (John 15:14).

“For this is the love of God, that we keep his commandments. And his commandments are not burdensome” (1 John 5:3).

“Whoever says ‘I know him’ but does not keep his commandments is a liar, and the truth is not in him…” (1 John 2:4)

“And this is love, that we walk according to his commandments; this is the commandment, just as you have heard from the beginning, so that you should walk in it” (2 John 1:6).

“‘Whoever has my commandments and keeps them, he it is who loves me. And he who loves me will be loved by my Father, and I will love him and manifest myself to him.’ Judas (not Iscariot) said to him, ‘Lord, how is it that you will manifest yourself to us, and not to the world?’ Jesus answered him, ‘If anyone loves me, he will keep my word, and my Father will love him, and we will come to him and make our home with him’” (John 14:21-23).